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Web Articles
           The Florida Statutory Procedure for
                             Evicting Tenants

The most common reason a landlord seeks to recover
possession of leased premises from either a
commercial tenant
or a
residential tenant is the failure of the tenant to pay rent in
accordance with the terms of the lease agreement.  Florida law
does not permit landlords to utilize self-help techniques such as
changing locks to the leased premises, locking out the tenant,
removing outside doors, or disrupting utilities to remove tenants
and recover possession of the leased premises.  Therefore if a
landlord must remove either a commercial tenant or a
residential tenant to recover possession of the leased premises
then they must utilize legal action to evict the tenant.  In such
an event, applicable statutory provisions and the terms of the
lease agreement will dictate the rights of the landlord and to
what remedies the landlord is entitled.

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Craig W. Little, P.A.